Specialty Glass

Stress Photonics offers a wide range of glass stress imaging tools to inspect specialty glass for stress states such as

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High Velocity Impact Stress

High Velocity Impact Stress

The images below are HVI (Hyper Velocity Impact) defects created when a small but extremely fast moving space particle impacted the space shuttle orbiter window in flight. The defects are characterized by loss of glass in a central pit, periphery fracture damage, the re‐fusing of glass and the imbedding of glass into the structure below causing a radial stress pattern. Subsurface cracks are not uncommon. They generally are close to plane ‐parallel or make a slight angle with the surface.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HVI

Hyper Velocity Impact (HVI) stress created when a small but extremely fast moving space particle impacts the NASA space shuttle orbiter windshield in space flight. The GFP1600 Test Stand or the GFP1600 Desk/Micro is recommended for this type of application.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HVI

Visible light image of Hyper Velocity Impact (HVI) stress created when a small but extremely fast moving space particle impacts the shuttle orbiter window in space flight.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HVI

Stress image of Hyper Velocity Impact (HVI) stress created when a small but extremely fast moving space particle impacts the shuttle orbiter window in space flight.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HVI

Visible light image of Hyper Velocity Impact (HVI) stress created when a small but extremely fast moving space particle impacts the shuttle orbiter window in space flight.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HVI

Shear Max image of Hyper Velocity Impact (HVI) stress created when a small but extremely fast moving space particle impacts the shuttle orbiter window in space flight.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HVI

Line plot of Max in-plane shear of Hyper Velocity Impact (HVI) stress created when a small but extremely fast moving space particle impacts the shuttle orbiter window in space flight.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HITF

HITF (Hyper Velocity Impact Testing Facility) stress image of a NASA space shuttle orbiter windshield. HITF is a laboratory simulation of HVI (Hyper Velocity Impact).

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HITF

HITF (High Velocity Impact Testing Facility) visible light image of damage to a shuttle orbiter windshield. HITF is a laboratory simulation of HVI (Hyper Velocity Impact).

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield

HITF (High Velocity Impact Testing Facility) stress image of damage to a shuttle orbiter windshield. HITF is a laboratory simulation of HVI (Hyper Velocity Impact).

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield

Stress image of a bruise on a space shuttle orbiter windshield. Bruise was caused by the HVI (Hyper Velocity Impact) of a particle hitting the windshield in space.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield Bruise

The image above is a visible light image of a bruise on a NASA space shuttle orbiter windshield. The image was acquired with a special GFP system developed in partnership with NASA.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield HVI

Visible light image of damage to a shuttle orbiter windshield caused by HVI (Hyper Velocity Impact). The image was acquired with a special GFP system developed in partnership with NASA.

NASA Shuttle Orbital Windshield Bruise

A bruise on a space shuttle windshield. Reflection is measured with a real-time stress measurement system like the GFP2600. Transmission image is measured with a system like the GFP1600.

Space Shuttle Windshield Chatter Checks

Stress images of a NASA space shuttle orbiter windshield chatter checks. The system that acquired the stress images is similar to the GFP1600. Click the button below to read more!

Space Shuttle Windshield Chatter Checks

Stress images of a shuttle orbiter windshield chatter checks. On the left, normal stress and on the right you’ll see Shear 0. The system that acquired the images is similar to the GFP1600.
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Need help? Email our expert support team via our contact form or call us at +1 (608)224-1230

Need help? Email our support
team via our contact form
or call us at +1 (608)224-1230

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